APOLLO PARTS 1&2
  "Soars thrillingly high..."
— Steve Oxman, L.A. TIMES


APOLLO PARTS 1&2  "...evocative montage of dance, spoken-word, documentary film and old-fashioned interrogation scenes ...echoes with the moral indignation ofArthur Miller...In her sparkling, poetical production, Keystone is like a lonely, outraged Jesuit, questioning the cost to the soul of blood-stained accomplishments, however lofty."  
— Steven Leigh Morris (from short review), L.A. WEEKLY----PICK OF THE WEEK!

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APOLLO PARTS 1&2   “…ebullient, visually oriented and choreographically inventive…Keystone has a gift for tapping into new ways of illuminating events…”
— Joel Hirschhorn, DAILY VARIETY


APOLLO PARTS 1&2  "...truly dynamic production...talented cast...Keystone...exerts her phenomenal theatrical aesthetic through taut staging and seamless integration of movement and text."
—Allen Moon, FLAVORPILL


APOLLO PARTS 1&2   "...a remarkable achievement...world-class theatre ...amazing actors...(Keystone's) is a gargantuan gift, evoking images of Orson Welles, Fellini, Julie Taymor, and even a dollop of Chaplin...this is an important piece of unstoppable and courageous theatre."
— Travis Michael Holder, REVIEWPLAYS.COM


APOLLO PARTS 1&2  “…full of brilliance…formidable…cuts open your mind and heart and digs in, you leave the theater knowing that you have been reactivated as a living and breathing human being.”
— Deanna Alisa Ableser, EASY READER

CYMBELINE:  " …starkly glamorous imagination…beautiful, almost hypnotic staging that employs exactingly formal choreography, a macabre aural environment…and a…visual vocabulary that oozes spooky chic. The effect is dreamlike, almost cinematic, and causes you to think that the play itself is losing its mind, which it often is. Keystone is a master illusionist who puts her vision in front of the narrative and never holds back."
— Wendell Brock, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, 2003


WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?  ":…harrowing yet hugely entertaining production…one of Center Stage's best shows in its past several seasons. Director Nancy Keystone and her stars…begin with a profound playfulness, which achieves two things: It makes the eventual moments of conflict all the more brutal, and it unleashes the extraordinary laughter that is so key to the play."
— Bob Hicks, THE OREGONIAN, 2003


THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT: "...The tone is like a sledgehammer pounding an anvil. When sparks fly, they are the words of the poems...THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT is a labor of devotion whose integrity resonates from the stage...an emotional cry, a tone poem, an ode to the vigor of the crafted word, and to the people who craft it."
— Steven Leigh-Morris, LA WEEKLY, 2000


THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT: "...dazzling epic movement piece...a riveting narrative...stunning choreography and visual tables...intoxicating milieu..."
— Miriam Jacobson, LA WEEKLY, 2000


THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT:  "...lyrical...intense...elegant and spare..."
— Jana J. Monji, LA TIMES, 2000


"THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT is a numinous study of the struggle of the artist against the state and the often appalling costs of that struggle. Theater doesn't get any more compelling or meaningful than this."
— T.S. Kerrigan, AMERICAN REPORTER, 2000


THE AKHMATOVA PROJECT: "...the final scene is more like a vacuum struggling against the audience's soul than a culmination or conclusion. I literally felt my soul sucked out of my body in that last moment--and no one, no thing, no single event has ever done that to me."
— Scott Schaeffer, Editor, MUNDANE BEHAVIOR


HAMLET: "This...HAMLET knows exactly where it's hurtling, and it carries us along like passengers on Poe's hell-bound ghost ship...Director Nancy Keystone has a vision layered in mysteries, befitting a play that has tantalized us for 400 years...This HAMLET does more than get under your skin--it detonates deep in your brain."
— Dan Hulbert, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, 1995


HAMLET: "This HAMLET is a brave new world about political paranoia, filled with hidden microphones, co-conspirators, intrigue, sex, passion, and, oh yes, the clearest rendering of Shakespeare's text you'll ever see on stage. It is a mind-blowing, shuddering experience, a nightmare brought to life through the brilliant, clear-headed direction of Nancy Keystone...This is not HAMLET for the Barrymore crowd. This is HAMLET for us...it is so good, so intense, and so strongly staged that you will be stunned by it. I cannot recommend it enough."
— Michael Kape, WABE-FM/NPR, 1995


THREE SISTERS: "Nancy Keystone, who in 1995, staged a dynamic HAMLET, directs an even better THREE SISTERS for Actor's Express. Keystone delivers disillusionment and heartache with such stinging force...still there's lots of rueful humor to warm the evening. Leaving this dynamically acted production, you may feel haunted--even melancholy--but you have the rare thrill of having seen lives on a stage fully lived."
— Dan Hulbert, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, 1996


A DOLL'S HOUSE: "One of the beauties of Nancy Keystone's direction and set design...is the way that all four doors of the Victorian parlor take on a life of their own, eerily foreshadowing the volcanic upheaval in the life of Nora. There are moments in the heat of action when a doorknob turns and, with Nora, you hold your breath... Though the ending is no secret, Keystone's tautly balanced production keeps you guessing...Swinging lightly, silently on those hinges is a terrifying immensity of choice." — Dan Hulbert, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, 1999


LOW LEVEL PANIC: "Nancy Keystone's direction is about as compelling and thoughtful al the Los Angeles theatre scene has to offer. There is not one moment of LOW LEVEL PANIC that does not ring of truth...under Keystone's guidance, (it) works as a drama, a documentary and an introduction to a world we may not enjoy but must acknowledge."
— Bruce Feld, DRAMA-LOGUE, 1992


LOW LEVEL PANIC: "Director Nancy Keystone's production...is the real issue-oriented, feminist thing: a stinging flesh-and-blood rebuke against sex as ritual and women as sex objects."
— Ray Loynd, LA TIMES, 1992


UNIDENTIFIED HUMAN REMAINS AND THE TRUE NATURE OF LOVE: "I can't remember any play in which I simultaneously disliked the script and admired the production so much."
— Dan Hulbert, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, 1994